K-30.pdf 데이터시트 (총 9 페이지) - 파일 다운로드 K-30 데이타시트 다운로드

No Preview Available !

    131 Business Center Drive, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
877.678.4259 Toll Free | 866.422.2356 Fax 
Sales@CO2Meter.com | www.CO2Meter.com 
Datasheet: K-30 Sensor
The K30 sensor is a low cost, infrared and maintenancefree transmitter 
module intended to be built into different host devices that require CO2 
monitoring data.  
Applications
The K30 is an accurate, yet low cost gas sensing solution for OEMs who 
wish to integrate CO2 gas sensing into their product without investing in 
their own gas sensor development. The compact sized and low powered 
module is intended to be an addon component to compliment other 
microprocessorbased controls and equipment. 
The K30 may be software customized in different ways in order to 
optimize the total system with respect to the OEM application. 
The K30 is offered for installation in OEM IAQ sensor housings, OEM air handling units, OEM alarm sensor housings, among other 
applications. The only restriction for what this product can be used for is the creativity and inventiveness of the customer. 
This new product version is a RoHS compliant upgrade replacing the former the K30 product, has the same key product 
performance, but now has an improved speed of response and a reduced spatial buildin height. 
 
Terminal Descriptions
The table below specifies what terminals and I/O options are available in the general K30 platform (see also the layout picture Fig. 
2). Please note, however, that in the K30STA default configuration, only OUT1, OUT2, OUT3, OUT4, Din1, Din2 and Status have any 
preprogrammed functions. These are described in the chapter “Default Configuration”. 
Functional group  Descriptions and ratings 
Power supply 
G+ referred to G0:  Absolute maximum ratings 5.5 to 14V, stabilized to within 10%
5V to 9V preferred operating range. 
Unprotected against reverse connection! 
Serial Communication 
UART (TxD, RxD) 
CMOS, ModBus communication protocol.
Logical levels corresponds 3.3V powered logics. Refer “ModBus on CO2 
Engine K30  for electrical specification. 
Outputs 
OUT1 
Buffered linear output 0..4 or 1..4VDC or 0..10V or 2..10V, depending on 
specified power supply and sensor configuration. ROUT < 100 W, RLOAD > 5 kW 
Load to ground only! 
Resolution 10mV (8.5 bits in the range 0..4V). 
OUT2 
Buffered linear output 0..4 or 1..4VDC or 0..5V or 1..5V, depending on 
specified power supply and sensor configuration. ROUT < 100 W, RLOAD > 5 kW 
Load to ground only! 
Resolution 5mV 
Can be used as alternative for OUT1, or for a second data channel, or in an 
independent linear control loop, such as a housing temperature stabilization 
OUT3 
CMOS unprotected. Digital (High/Low) output.
High Output level in the range 2.3V min to DVDD = 3.3V. (1 mA source) 
Low output level 0.75V max (4 mA sink) 
 
  Revision 1.3  May 2015 
 
1 

No Preview Available !

    131 Business Center Drive, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
877.678.4259 Toll Free | 866.422.2356 Fax 
Sales@CO2Meter.com | www.CO2Meter.com 
Can be used for gas alarm indication, or for status indication etc.
OUT4 
CMOS unprotected. Digital (High/Low) output.
High Output level in the range 2.3V min to DVDD = 3.3V. (1 mA source) 
Low output level 0.75V max (4 mA sink) 
Can be used for gas alarm indication, or for status indication etc. 
Status 
CMOS unprotected. 
High Output level in the range 2.3V min to DVDD 
  DVDD Regulated Voltage Output 3.3V to 50mA
Inputs 
Din0, Din1, Din2,  Digital switch inputs, pullup 120k to DVCC 3.3V. Driving it Low or connecting to 
Din3, 
ground G0 activates input. 
Din4 
Pullup resistance is decreased to 4..10k during read of input or jumper. 
Advantages are lower consumption most of the time the input/jumper is kept low 
and larger current for jumpers read in order to provide cleaning of the contact. 
Can be used to initiate calibration or to switch output range or to force output to 
predefined state. All depends on customer needs. 
I2C extension. 
See our I2C Comm.  Pullup of SDA and SCL lines to 3.3V
guide 
 
Table 1. I/O notations used in this document for the K30 platform with some descriptions and ratings.  
Please, beware of the red colored texts that pinpoint important features for the system integration! 
General PCB Overview
 
Figure 2.  K30 I/O notations, terminal positions and some important dimensions for mounting the K30 platform PCB into a 
host system (Top view). The blue filled pins are defined by default. 
 
  Revision 1.3  May 2015 
  2 

No Preview Available !

    131 Business Center Drive, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
877.678.4259 Toll Free | 866.422.2356 Fax 
Sales@CO2Meter.com | www.CO2Meter.com 
Figure 3. K30 OBA position. 
 
Figure 4. K30 mechanical drawing. 
    Revision 1.3  May 2015 
 
  3 

No Preview Available !

    131 Business Center Drive, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
877.678.4259 Toll Free | 866.422.2356 Fax 
Sales@CO2Meter.com | www.CO2Meter.com 
Installation
The modules are factory calibrated and ready for use directly after power up. There are several alternative ways to connect the K30 
to a host system (see also Figure 2): 
1. Using “UART connector”, including terminals for power supply (G+ and G0), UART (TxD, RxD). 
2. Using the 3 pins main terminal. Available signals are power supply (G+ and G0) and the buffered analogue output (OUT1). A 
variety of user selections exist for this option regarding standard 5.08 mm pitch components and mounting alternatives 
(top/bottom). 
3. Using 20 pin connector strips, or IDC connector, most of the system information is reached. 
Host Integration Considerations and EMI Shielding
If an IDC connector is being used to connect the K30 module to a host PCB, this connector can in some situations be used as the only 
fixture. If instead fixing the K30 PCB using mechanical poles and screws, no more than 2 positions should be considered. This is 
because the PCB should not be exposed to any mechanical stress, and it is small and lightweight enough for just 2 attachment 
points. 
To provide means for attachments, there are 4 possible screw holes available, all of them having a collar that is electrically 
connected to ground (G0). These connections are, however, not totally equivalent:   
The two screw points in the upper left corner (having the IDC and edge connectors faced downwards, as in Figure 2) are connected 
to the analogue ground. They are the preferred choice for connection to some EMI shield, if so is required. This is normally necessary 
only if the application is such that large EMFs are foreseen. If this option is being used, precaution must be taken so as to exclude 
any power supply currents! Sensor reading instability is an indication of the need for shielding, or of improper enclosure system 
groundings. 
The two screw points in the right bottom corner are connected to the digital ground. Connection to some EMI housing shield is less 
effective when this option is used, but on the other hand the sensor may be powered via these connections. 
Note 1: To avoid ground loops, one should avoid connecting the analogue and digital grounds externally! They are connected 
internally on the K30 PCB. 
Note 2: The terminals are not protected against reverse voltages and current spikes! Proper ESD protection is required during 
handling, as well as by the host interface design. 
 
Default Functions / Configuration
Outputs
The basic K30STA configuration is a simple analogue output sensor transmitter signal directed to OUT1 and OUT2. Via the edge 
connector serial communication terminal, the CO2 readings are available to an even higher precision (Modbus protocol), together 
with additional system information such as sensor status, analogue outputs, and other variables. 
 
Terminals 
Output 
Correspondence 
OUT1 
0,0…4,0 VDC 
0…2,000 ppm CO2 
OUT2 
1,0…5,0 VDC 
0…2,000 ppm CO2 
Table 2. Default analogue output configuration for K30STA 
 
  Revision 1.3  May 2015 
  4 

No Preview Available !

    131 Business Center Drive, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
877.678.4259 Toll Free | 866.422.2356 Fax 
Sales@CO2Meter.com | www.CO2Meter.com 
 
The basic K30STA configuration provides digital outputs to indicate if CO2 concentration exceeds alarm threshold. 
Terminals 
Output 
Correspondence 
OUT3 
Logical levels: 
Low < 0.75V 
High = 5V 
OUT4 
Logical levels: 
Low < 0.75V 
High = 5V 
Table 3. Default digital output configuration for K30STA 
 
 
 
Calibration
The default sensor OEM unit is maintenance free in normal environments thanks to the builtin selfcorrecting ABC algorithm 
(Automatic Baseline Correction). This algorithm constantly keeps track of the sensor’s lowest reading over a 7.5 days interval and 
slowly corrects for any longterm drift detected as compared to the expected fresh air value of 400 ppm CO2. 
Defaults
K30 Sensors  ABC on by default 
K30 SDKs  ABC off by default 
For applications where the sensor will never read 400ppm (fresh) air, the K30 should be ordered with ABC disabled. 
 
Manual Calibration
Rough handling and transportation may reduce sensor reading accuracy. With time, the ABC function will tune the readings back to 
the correct numbers. The default “tuning speed” is however limited to about 30 ppm/week. For post calibration convenience, in the 
event that one cannot wait for the ABC algorithm to cure any calibration offset, or if ABC is disabled, two switch inputs ‐ Din1 and 
Din2 ‐ select of two prepared calibration codes. If Din1 is shorted to ground for a minimum of 8 seconds, the internal calibration 
code bCAL (background calibration) is executed, in which case it is assumed that the sensor is operating in a fresh air environment 
(400 ppm CO2). If Din2 is shorted for a minimum of 8 seconds, the alternative operation code CAL (zero calibration) is executed in 
which case the sensor is assumed to be in a gas mixture free from CO2 (i.e. Nitrogen or Soda Lime CO2 scrubbed air).  
Input Switch Terminal 
(normally open) 
Default function 
(when closed for minimum 8 seconds) 
Din1 
bCAL (background calibration) assuming 400 ppm CO2 sensor exposure 
Din2 
CAL (zero calibration) assuming 0 ppm CO2 sensor exposure 
Table 3. Switch input default configurations for K30 
 
  Revision 1.3  May 2015 
  5